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(01/01/06) -

Russians Regret Collapse of Soviet Union

(Angus Reid Global Scan) – Many adults in Russia remain disappointed over the end of the Soviet Union, according to a poll by the All-Russian Public Opinion Research Center. 66 per cent of respondents regret the collapse of the country.

(Angus Reid Global Scan) – Many adults in Russia remain disappointed over the end of the Soviet Union, according to a poll by the All-Russian Public Opinion Research Center. 66 per cent of respondents regret the collapse of the country.

The Soviet Union was officially established in 1922, following the Bolshevik Revolution. Mikhail Gorbachev was the leader of the Soviet Communist Party from 1985 to 1991. He envisioned the policies of “perestroika” (restructuring)—a series of economic reforms to improve worker productivity and living standards—and “glasnost” (openness) which introduced greater personal freedoms and sought to foster debate.

On Aug. 19, 1991, the State Emergency Committee launched a coup against Gorbachev in an attempt to keep the Soviet leader from signing a new treaty that would have provided a large degree of independence to the Soviet Union’s republics. The coup attempt severely hampered Gorbachev’s authority. The Russian Federation was formed in December 1991, after public support shifted to Russian nationalist Boris Yeltsin.

In his April 2005 address to the State Duma, Russian president Vladimir Putin declared, “It must be admitted that the collapse of the Soviet Union was the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century.”

Polling Data

Do you regret the collapse of the Soviet Union?

Yes

66%

No

23%

Not important

6%

Hard to answer

5%

Source: All-Russian Public Opinion Research Center
Methodology: Interviews with 1,579 Russian adults, conducted on Dec. 15 and Dec. 16, 2005. Margin of error is 3.4 per cent.