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(10/21/06) -

Spaniards Support Monarchy Amendment

- Many adults in Spain think a woman should be allowed to ascend the throne, according to a poll by Sigma Dos published in El Mundo. 81 per cent of respondents believe the constitution should be amended to allow a woman to become the monarch.

- Many adults in Spain think a woman should be allowed to ascend the throne, according to a poll by Sigma Dos published in El Mundo. 81 per cent of respondents believe the constitution should be amended to allow a woman to become the monarch.

In November 1975, Juan Carlos I officially became Spain’s monarch following the death of dictator Francisco Franco. Juan Carlos oversaw the European nation’s transition into democratic rule.

In October 2005, Princess Leonor—the first child of Prince Felipe and Princess Letizia—was born in Spain. The current constitution stipulates that Leonor should relinquish her claim to the throne to any younger brother she may come to have. The position of Felipe as the current heir to Juan Carlos I is predicated on this doctrinal interpretation of primogeniture, as he has two elder sisters.

Last year, a document presented by the government of president José Luis Rodr­guez Zapatero—the leader of the Socialist Worker’s Party (PSOE)—said the present succession rules are “tantamount to the continuation of a type of discrimination against women (royals).” The current administration has suggested that any constitutional changes be enacted in a way that does not affect Felipe’s current position as heir. Prince Felipe and Princess Letizia are expecting their second child.

On Oct. 16, Popular Party (PP) leader Mariano Rajoy expressed his views on the proposed amendment, saying, “The opposition will always act with common sense.”

Polling Data

Should the constitution be amended to allow a woman to become the monarch?

Yes

81%

No

9%

Source: Sigma Dos / El Mundo
Methodology: Telephone interviews with 800 Spanish adults, conducted from Oct. 6 to Oct. 9, 2006. Margin of error is 3.5 per cent.