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(06/29/07) -

Denmark’s Opposition SD Leads All Parties

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – The opposition Social Democracy in Denmark (SD) is the most popular political party in the Scandinavian country, according to a poll by Megafon released by TV2. 25 per cent of respondents would back the Social Democrats in the next general election, down 0.8 points since late May.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – The opposition Social Democracy in Denmark (SD) is the most popular political party in the Scandinavian country, according to a poll by Megafon released by TV2. 25 per cent of respondents would back the Social Democrats in the next general election, down 0.8 points since late May.

The governing Left, Liberal Party of Denmark (V) is second with 24.1 per cent, followed by the Danish People’s Party (DF) with 12.3 per cent, the New Alliance (NA) with 9.6 per cent, the Conservative People’s Party (KF) with 8.9 per cent, the Socialist People’s Party (SF) with 8.8 per cent, and the Radical Left-Social Liberal Party (RV) with 7.4 per cent. Support is lower for the Unity List-The Red Greens (EL), the Christian Democrats (KD), and the Centre-Democrats (CD).

In the February 2005 election, the Liberals received 29 per cent of the vote and elected 52 lawmakers to the People’s Diet—four less than in the 2001 ballot. The governing centre-right coalition remained in place with the support of 92 legislators. Liberal leader Anders Fogh Rasmussen has acted as prime minister since November 2001. In April 2005, Helle Thorning-Schmidt became the new leader of the Social Democrats, replacing Mogens Likketoft. Denmark has never had a female head of government.

Last month, former Radical Left member Naser Khader assembled the New Alliance, declaring, “We feel politically homeless and believe that there are many others who feel the same way.” Khader said his party is interested in a coalition with Rasmussen’s Liberals after the 2009 election.

On Jun. 25, European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso travelled to Greenland, a semi-autonomous Danish territory, where he visited a melting glacier. Barroso talked to reporters about the importance of acting to curb global warming, saying, “We must do something. The situation is very dramatic.” Rasmussen referred to Barroso’s visit, and said: “Greenland today stands as the symbol of climate changes.”

Polling Data

What party would you support in the next general election?

Jun. 16

May 30

May 10

Social Democracy in Denmark (SD)

25.0%

25.8%

25.4%

Left, Liberal Party of Denmark (V)

24.1%

24.3%

21.7%

Danish People’s Party (DF)

12.3%

11.2%

12.5%

New Alliance (NA)

9.6%

11.3%

16.5%

Conservative People’s Party (KF)

8.9%

9.3%

7.7%

Socialist People’s Party (SF)

8.8%

9.5%

8.8%

Radical Left-Social Liberal Party (RV)

7.4%

3.7%

3.4%

Unity List-The Red Greens (EL)

2.3%

3.1%

2.5%

Christian Democrats (KD)

1.4%

1.4%

1.1%

Centre-Democrats (CD)

0.2%

0.2%

0.4%

Source: Megafon / TV2
Methodology: Telephone and online interviews with 1,312 Dane adults, conducted on Jun. 15 and Jun. 16, 2007. Margin of error is 2 per cent.