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illinois18
(06/27/05) -

Illinois Rejects Same-Sex Marriage, Backs Civil Unions

(Angus Reid Global Scan) – Many adults in the Prairie State are against the concept of wedlock for homosexual partners, according to a poll released by Equality Illinois. 48 per cent of respondents in Illinois oppose allowing same-sex marriage, while 39 per cent support the idea.

(Angus Reid Global Scan) – Many adults in the Prairie State are against the concept of wedlock for homosexual partners, according to a poll released by Equality Illinois. 48 per cent of respondents in Illinois oppose allowing same-sex marriage, while 39 per cent support the idea.

During the January 2004 State of the Union address, United States president George W. Bush said, “Activist judges (…) have begun redefining marriage by court order, without regard for the will of the people and their elected representatives.”

In 2004, marriage certificates were issued to same-sex couples by local governments in the states of California, Oregon, New Mexico and New York. Last May, the state of Massachusetts allowed gay and lesbian partners to apply for marriage licenses, the first state-sanctioned homosexual weddings in the U.S.

Civil unions—currently available in the states of Vermont and Connecticut—give same-sex partners the same legal rights of married couples such as inheritance, insurance and hospital visiting privileges. A California law grants domestic partners the same legal rights of married couples, with the exception of filing joint income tax returns. 53 per cent of respondents support allowing civil unions in Illinois.

Last November, voters in 11 American states enacted amendments to define marriage as the union between a man and a woman.

Polling Data

Do you support or oppose allowing same-sex marriage?

Support

39%

Oppose

48%

Do you support or oppose allowing civil unions?

Support

53%

Oppose

36%

Source: Equality Illinois
Methodology: Telephone interviews to 600 registered Illinois voters, conducted from Jun. 6 to Jun. 8, 2005. Margin of error is 4 per cent.