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aus_05291
(09/10/07) -

ALP Surges, Coalition Stumbles in Australia

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Support for the opposition Australian Labor Party (ALP) increased this month, according to a poll by Roy Morgan International. 49 per cent of respondents would vote for the ALP in this year’s election to the House of Representatives, up three points since late August.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Support for the opposition Australian Labor Party (ALP) increased this month, according to a poll by Roy Morgan International. 49 per cent of respondents would vote for the ALP in this year’s election to the House of Representatives, up three points since late August.

The governing Coalition of Liberals and Nationals is second with 34.5 per cent—down 6.5 points in a week—followed by the Australian Greens with nine per cent. Support is lower for Family First, the Australian Democrats, and One Nation. Australia’s preferential voting system—where electors indicate an order of predilection for each contender, and the ballots from smaller parties are re-distributed—gives the ALP a 21-point lead over the Coalition.

In the October 2004 election, Australian prime minister John Howard was rewarded with a fourth term in office, as the Coalition secured 87 seats in the House of Representatives. The ALP—led by Mark Latham—elected 60 lawmakers. In December 2006, foreign affairs spokesman Kevin Rudd became the new leader of the ALP, defeating Kim Beazley in an internal caucus ballot.

On Sept. 7, Rudd called for specific action against global warming, saying, "My challenge to Mr. Howard is use this opportunity to turn the corner on climate change and ratify Kyoto and work within the United Nations (UN) framework to deal with climate change. (…) Progress must be made but progress must be real. My definition of real progress is real targets against real timelines."

In 1998, several countries agreed to the Kyoto Protocol, a proposed amendment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The agreement commits nations to reduce their emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Australia has not ratified the Kyoto Protocol.

Australia is expected to hold a legislative election in October or November 2007.

Polling Data

What party would you vote for in the next election to the House of Representatives?

 

Sept. 2

Aug. 26

Aug. 12

Australian Labor Party

49%

46%

49.5%

Coalition (Liberal / National)

34.5%

41%

36.5%

Australian Greens

9%

6.5%

7%

Family First

2%

1.5%

2%

Australian Democrats

2%

1%

1.5%

One Nation

0.5%

1%

1%

Two-Party Preferred Vote

 

Sept. 2

Aug. 26

Aug. 12

Australian Labor Party

60.5%

54%

58.5%

Coalition (Liberal / National)

39.5%

46%

41.5%


Source: Roy Morgan International
Methodology: Face-to-face interviews with 915 Australian voters, conducted on Sept. 1 and Sept. 2, 2007. No margin of error was provided.