The Poll Archive RSS

canada_peace
(01/05/09) -

Canadians Want Quicker End to Afghan Mission

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Many adults in Canada want their government to end its current military deployment in Afghanistan before the scheduled departure date, according to a poll by Angus Reid Strategies released by the Toronto Star. 53 per cent of respondents believe the bulk of Canadian troops in Afghanistan should be withdrawn before 2011.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Many adults in Canada want their government to end its current military deployment in Afghanistan before the scheduled departure date, according to a poll by Angus Reid Strategies released by the Toronto Star. 53 per cent of respondents believe the bulk of Canadian troops in Afghanistan should be withdrawn before 2011.

Conversely, 30 per cent of respondents would remove most soldiers in 2011, while eight per cent would retain Canadian troops in Afghanistan after 2011.

Afghanistan has been the main battleground in the war on terrorism. The conflict began in October 2001, after the Taliban regime refused to hand over Osama bin Laden, prime suspect in the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. Al-Qaeda operatives hijacked and crashed four airplanes on Sept. 11, 2001, killing nearly 3,000 people.

At least 1,037 soldiers—including 106 Canadians—have died in the war on terrorism, either in support of the U.S.-led Operation Enduring Freedom or as part of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) led by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

Canadians renewed the House of Commons in January 2006. The Conservative party—led by Stephen Harper—received 36.3 per cent of the vote, and secured 124 seats in the 308-member lower house. Harper formed a minority administration after more than 12 years of government by the Liberal party.

In May 2006, the House of Commons extended Canada’s mission in Afghanistan until February 2009. In March 2008, the House of Commons voted 198-77 to prolong the military deployment until the end of 2011. The Conservative and Liberal parties supported the motion, while the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Bloc Québécois opposed it. In September, Harper assured that there would be no new extension of the mission.

A new presidential election is expected to take place in Afghanistan in 2009. On Dec. 27, Canadian defence minister Peter MacKay predicted a tougher year for soldiers, saying, "[The Taliban] are going to try to disrupt this election, and inevitably they will step up their violence against their own citizens and against coalition forces. So that’s one explanation for a spike that will likely come."

Polling Data

As you may know, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has said that Canada would withdraw the bulk of the troops currently deployed in Afghanistan in 2011. Which of these statements comes closest to your own point of view?

 

Dec. 2008

Nov. 2008

The bulk of the troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan before 2011

53%

53%

The bulk of the troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan in 2011 as scheduled

30%

33%

The bulk of the troops should remain in Afghanistan after 2011

8%

7%

Not sure

8%

8%

Source: Angus Reid Strategies
Methodology: Online interviews with 1,004 Canadian adults, conducted on Dec. 19 and Dec. 20, 2008. Margin of error is 3.1 per cent.

 

Complete Poll (PDF)