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abortion-2
(01/22/09) -

Americans Review Access to Abortion

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Many adults in the United States question their country’s pregnancy termination regulations, according to a poll by Rasmussen Reports. 39 per cent of respondents think it is too easy for anyone in the U.S. to get an abortion, while 18 per cent believe it is too hard to do so.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Many adults in the United States question their country’s pregnancy termination regulations, according to a poll by Rasmussen Reports. 39 per cent of respondents think it is too easy for anyone in the U.S. to get an abortion, while 18 per cent believe it is too hard to do so.

The 1973 Supreme Court ruling gave American women the right to an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy, and regulated the procedure during the second trimester "in ways that are reasonably related to maternal health." In the third trimester, a state can choose to proscribe abortion, except when necessary "for the preservation of the life or health of the mother."

On Jan. 15, U.S. president George W. Bush issued a proclamation for the National Sanctity of Human Life Day. The document read: "The most basic duty of government is to protect the life of the innocent. My administration has been committed to building a culture of life by vigorously promoting adoption and parental notification laws, opposing federal funding for abortions overseas, encouraging teen abstinence, and funding crisis pregnancy programs."

In American elections, candidates require 270 votes in the Electoral College to win the White House. In November 2008, Democratic nominee Barack Obama secured a majority of electoral votes, defeating Republican candidate John McCain. On Jan. 20, Obama became the first African American president in U.S. history.

Polling Data

In the United States, is it too easy or too hard for anyone to get an abortion?

Too easy

39%

Too hard

18%

About right

25%

Not sure

18%

Source: Rasmussen Reports
Methodology: Telephone interviews with 1,000 American adults, conducted on Jan. 12 and Jan. 13, 2009. Margin of error is 3 per cent.