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(12/30/09) -

Americans Divided on Second Term for Obama

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – People in the United States are split on whether their president will earn a second term in office, according to a poll by Angus Reid Public Opinion. 46 per cent of respondents believe it is likely that Barack Obama will be re-elected, while 44 per cent think this is unlikely.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – People in the United States are split on whether their president will earn a second term in office, according to a poll by Angus Reid Public Opinion. 46 per cent of respondents believe it is likely that Barack Obama will be re-elected, while 44 per cent think this is unlikely.

In addition, 51 per cent of respondents predict that every American will have access to health care in the next decade, and 52 per cent foresee the legalization of same-sex marriage in at least half of the U.S.’s 50 states.

In American elections, candidates require 270 votes in the Electoral College to win the White House. In November 2008, Democratic nominee Obama secured a majority of electoral votes, defeating McCain. In January, Obama became the first African American president in U.S. history.

In November, lawmakers in the House of Representatives approved the health care reform bill—known as the Affordable Health Care for America Act—in a 220-215 vote. Earlier this month, the Senate passed its version of the bill in a 60-39 vote. Obama declared: "This will be the most important piece of social legislation since the Social Security Act passed in the 1930s and the most important reform of our health care system since Medicare passed in the 1960s."

On Dec. 27, Democratic Pennsylvania senator Arlen Specter—who was elected to the U.S. Senate as a Republican—discussed the effect health care reform may have on the next presidential election, saying, "[Republican South Carolina senator Jim] DeMint is the author of the famous statement that this is going to be President Obama’s Waterloo, that this ought to be used to break the president, so that before the ink was dry on the oath of office—and I know this because I was in the caucus—the Republicans were already plotting ways to beat President Obama in 2012."

DeMint declared: "I never wanted to break the president. We just wanted to break his momentum as he took over more and more of our economy and created more and more of our debt. The reason the Republicans didn’t have any ideas in the [health care] bill is that the Democrats didn’t allow it."

Polling Data

Do you think each of these is likely or unlikely to happen in the next 10 years? – Barack Obama re-elected as President of the United States

Very likely / Moderately likely

46%

Moderately unlikely / Very unlikely

44%

Not sure

10%

Do you think each of these is likely or unlikely to happen in the next 10 years? – Every American having access to health care

Very likely / Moderately likely

51%

Moderately unlikely / Very unlikely

41%

Not sure

8%

Do you think each of these is likely or unlikely to happen in the next 10 years? – Same-sex marriage legalized in at least half of the U.S. 50 states

Very likely / Moderately likely

52%

Moderately unlikely / Very unlikely

38%

Not sure

10%

Source: Angus Reid Public Opinion
Methodology: Online interviews with 1,006 American adults, conducted on Dec. 17 and Dec. 18, 2009. Margin of error is 3.1 per cent.

Complete Poll (PDF)