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uk_parliament
(03/08/07) -

Britons Search Beyond Gordon Brown

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Britain’s chancellor of the exchequer is having a hard time generating solid support, according to a poll by Populus published in The Times. 55 per cent of respondents think the governing Labour party would be better off under a younger, newer and less experienced rising star, while 33 per cent think Gordon Brown would be a more suitable leader.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Britain’s chancellor of the exchequer is having a hard time generating solid support, according to a poll by Populus published in The Times. 55 per cent of respondents think the governing Labour party would be better off under a younger, newer and less experienced rising star, while 33 per cent think Gordon Brown would be a more suitable leader.

In May 2005, British voters renewed the House of Commons. The Labour party secured 356 seats, followed by the Conservatives with 197 and the Liberal Democrats with 62. Labour leader Tony Blair has served as prime minister since 1997. In September 2006, Blair announced his eventual retirement from politics. Brown has been mentioned as his possible replacement.

Earlier this month, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) discussed the state of Britain’s economy in a report, which read: “The near and medium-term outlook is for continued strong and stable growth with a return of inflation to target. A number of directors considered, however, that vulnerabilities, including those associated with high housing prices, warrant vigilance.”

The next election to the House of Commons must be held on or before Jun. 3, 2010. Sitting prime ministers can dissolve Parliament and call an early ballot at their discretion.

Polling Data

Tony Blair will be standing down as Labour leader in the next few months and there is a debate going on within the Labour party and the media about what type of person the Labour party should look for when choosing a new leader.

The chancellor of the exchequer Gordon Brown has long been seen as the most likely person to take over from Tony Blair and many regard him as by the best qualified and most experienced candidate. But some people are now suggesting that Labour should instead choose one of the government’s rising stars—someone in their early 40s who is more identified with new concerns like the environment and less tarnished by association with unpopular decisions the government has taken over the years.

Do you think Labour would be better off going with Gordon Brown or with one of these rising stars who is younger and newer but less experienced and largely unknown?

All

Men

Women

Gordon Brown

33%

35%

31%

Younger, newer, less experienced rising star

55%

54%

56%

Source: Populus / The Times
Methodology: Telephone interviews with 1,509 British adults, conducted from Mar. 2 to Mar. 4, 2007. No margin of error was provided.