The Poll Archive RSS

issues_royal_uk
(05/03/12) -

Australians, Britons and Canadians Would Prefer Prince William as King

Respondents in Canada are more likely to voice support for “an elected head of state” than those in Australia or Britain.

People in Australia, Britain and Canada find the prospect of Prince William becoming their monarch more appealing than the notion of Prince Charles taking over from Queen Elizabeth II, a new Angus Reid Public Opinion poll has found.

The online survey of representative national samples in the three countries also found that Prince William and Kate Middleton have surpassed Queen Elizabeth II to become the most liked members of the Royal Family.

Future of the Monarchy

In Australia and Canada, about a third of respondents (36% and 33% respectively) say they would prefer for their countries to remain a monarchy.

However, the sentiment of Canadians to have an elected head of state reaches 37 per cent, while the proportion of Australians who want to see their country become a republic is decidedly lower, at 28 per cent. Australians are more likely to say that the debate over the future of the monarchy makes no difference to them (30%) than Canadians (20%).

In Britain, respondents prefer the monarchy to an elected head of state by a 4-to-1 margin (54% to 13%), with one-in-four (26%) voicing indifference on this matter.

The Royal Family

Prince William has become the most popular member of the Royal Family, with 83 per cent of Australians, 82 per cent of Britons and 77 per cent of Canadians saying they have a favourable opinion of him. His wife Kate Middleton is now second on the list with equally impressive ratings (79% in Australia, 77% in Britain and 73% in Canada).

Queen Elizabeth II is viewed favourably by seven-in-ten respondents in the three countries, and the ranking is similar for Prince Harry. Prince Philip is regarded in a positive light by half of Britons and Canadians, and 45 per cent of Australians.

The lowest rated members of the Royal Family are Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall. The heir to the throne gets a positive review from 45 per cent of Britons, 34 per cent of Canadians and 33 per cent of Australians. Camilla is viewed favourably by only three-in-ten Britons (31%), and her rating drops to 21 per cent in Canada and 16 per cent in Australia.

Succession

The popularity of Prince William is also evident in a question related to succession. Practically half of respondents in the three countries (52% of Australians, 51% of Britons and 47% of Canadians) say they would like Prince William to become King after Queen Elizabeth II.

Conversely, only 31 per cent of Britons, 17 per cent of Canadians and 13 per cent of Australians would prefer to see King Charles ascend the throne.

Country Breakdowns

In Australia, women (41%) and people over the age of 55 (45%) are more likely to voice support for the continuation of the monarchy, while men prefer the notion of becoming a republic (36%). The highest level of indifference to the debate is observed with Australians aged 35-to-54 (35%).

In Britain, the youngest demographic is more likely to voice indifference on this matter (33%), while majorities of middle-aged (52%) and older (68%) Britons want the UK to remain a monarchy. There is no discernible gender gap.

In Canada, the notion of an elected head of state is more popular with men (45%) than women (29%), and attracts at least a third of respondents across all three demographics. However, for older Canadians, indifference on the issue is supplanted by support for the continuation of the monarchy.

Full Report, Detailed Tables and Methodology (PDF)

CONTACT:

Mario Canseco, Vice President, Angus Reid Public Opinion
+877 730 3570
mario.canseco@angus-reid.com

Full Methodology Details:

Angus Reid Public Opinion and Vision Critical Australia conducted an online survey among:

- 1,506 Australian adults who are Nine Rewards panelists, from February 21 to February 29, 2012.
- 2,019 British adults who are Springboard UK panelists, from January 26 to January 27, 2012.
- 2,005 Canadian adults who are Angus Reid Forum panelists, from March 7 to March 8, 2012.

The margin of error—which measures sampling variability—is +/-2.5% for Australia, and +/-2.2% for Great Britain and Canada. The results have been statistically weighted according to the most current education, age, gender and region Census data to ensure a sample representative of the entire adult population of each country.