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(02/20/07) -

Connecticut Ponders Same-Sex Marriage

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Adults in the Constitution State are split on how to acknowledge gay and lesbian partnerships, according to a poll by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. 39 per cent of respondents in Connecticut would allow same-sex marriage, 33 per cent favour civil unions, and 22 per cent believe legal recognition is not warranted.

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Adults in the Constitution State are split on how to acknowledge gay and lesbian partnerships, according to a poll by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. 39 per cent of respondents in Connecticut would allow same-sex marriage, 33 per cent favour civil unions, and 22 per cent believe legal recognition is not warranted.

In 2004, marriage certificates were issued to same-sex couples by local governments in the states of California, Oregon, New Mexico and New York. In May 2004, the state of Massachusetts allowed gay and lesbian partners to apply for marriage licenses, the first state-sanctioned homosexual weddings in the United States.

Civil union and domestic partnership laws in Vermont, Connecticut and California grant same-sex couples all state-level rights and obligations of marriage—in areas such as inheritance, income tax, insurance and hospital visitation. Other forms of domestic partnership exist in the District of Columbia, Hawaii and Maine. There are more than 1,000 federal-level rights of marriage that cannot be granted by states.

In October 2006, New Jersey’s Supreme Court ordered the state legislature to grant the same rights and benefits of heterosexual couples to homosexual partnerships, but stopped short of defining these unions as marriages. The bill took effect yesterday.

On Feb. 16, New Jersey attorney general Stuart Rabner said same-sex couples who hold marriage certificates from other states and countries will be recognized as civil union partners in the Garden State, adding, “The name of the relationship selected by other jurisdictions will not control its treatment under New Jersey law.”

Polling Data

Do you think same-sex couples should be allowed legally to marry, should be allowed legally to form civil unions, but not marry, or should not be allowed to obtain legal recognition of their relationships?

Marry

39%

Civil unions

33%

No recognition

22%

Not sure

6%

Source: Quinnipiac University Polling Institute
Methodology: Telephone interviews to 1,087 registered Connecticut voters, conducted from Feb. 9 to Feb. 12, 2007. Margin of error is 3 per cent.